University Theses Related to Dialogue
and the
Middle East Public Peace Process


  ARAB-JEWISH COOPERATIVE COEXISTENCE IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE
        by Avi Zer-Aviv -- University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 2005

  BRIDGING DIFFERENT TRUTHS: Creating Dialogue for Reconciliation and Healing
        by Yuichi Ohta -- The International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, 2003

  BUILDING PEACE BETWEEN PEOPLE: The Role of NGOs in Transforming Relations Between Israelis and Palestinians
         by Louis-Alexandre Berg -- Brown University, 2000

  A CALL FOR ADVENTURE-BASED CONFLICT RESOLUTION
        by Shawn M. Dunning -- George Mason University, 2004

  THE COMPASSIONATE LISTENING PROJECT: A Case Study in Citizen Diplomacy and Peacemaking
         by Marie Pace -- Syracuse University, 2005

  COMPOSING A CIVIC LIFE: Influences of Sustained Dialogue on Post-Graduate Civic Engagement and Civic Life
        by Ande Diaz -- Fielding Graduate University -- Santa Barbara, CA, 2009

  CONVERSATIONS FOR PEACE: An Oral History of the Path to Palestinian and Jewish Reconciliation in Two California Communities
        by Allison Helise Rubalcava -- California State University - Fullerton, 2001

  DIALOGO INTERCULTURAL: Comunidad Arabe y Judia en Chile
         by Lorenzo Agar Corbinoes & Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein -- Santiago, Chile, 2009

   DIALOGUE BETWEEN CHRISTIANS, JEWS AND MUSLIMS: The Concept of Covenant as Basis
         by Ian Rex Fry, RDA -- MCD University of Divinity -- Kew, Victoria, Australia, 2012

  EVALUATING PEACE EDUCATION IN THE OSLO-INTIFADA GENERATION: A Long-Term Impact Study of Seeds of Peace 1993-2010
         by Ned Lazarus -- American University - Washington, DC USA, 2011

  THE FIELD BEYOND WRONGDOING AND RIGHTDOING: A Study of Arab-Jewish Grassroots Dialogue Groups in the United States
        by Nurete L. Brenner -- Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA, 2011

  GENERATING FORGIVENESS AND CONSTRUCTING PEACE THROUGH TRUTHFUL DIALOGUE: Abrahamic Perspectives
        by Hilarie Roseman -- Macquarie University, Sydney,Australia, 2013

  MUSIC FOR PEACE IN JERUSALEM: A Senior Essay in International Studies
        by Micah Hendler -- Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, 2012

  QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: Conflict Resolution Framework and Building Relationships Through Dialogue in the Peace It Together, 2008 Initiative
        by Danielle Sleiman -- Simon Fraser University - Vancouver, BC, Canada, 2008

  SHIFT HAPPENS: Transformation During Small Group Interventions in Protracted Social Conflicts
        by Nike Carstarphen -- George Mason University - Fairfax, VA, 2003

  TOWARD A TYPOLOGY OF DIALOGUE AND DELIBERATION
        by Adi Greif -- Stanford University - Stanford, CA, 2006


ARAB-JEWISH COOPERATIVE COEXISTENCE IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE

By Avi Zer-Aviv
E-mail: AviZer@yahoo.com

Thesis for Bachelor of Independent Studies Degree
Department of Independent Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, June 2005, 64 pages

In the author's words, this manuscript "a historical, personal, cultural, and creative journey on Arab-Jewish Relations in Ottoman Palestine over the last 400 years, with a focus on renewing the tradition of cooperative coexistence through analysis and grassroots peace building. There is much original research here, including three case studies and dozens of interviews with Israeli and Palestinian elders."

Download the complete manuscript:     (PDF file)    (Word document)

      The current conflict between Arabs and Jews in Israel/Palestine has ruptured relations between the two peoples, and essentially divided them along geographic, economic, cultural, political, and sociological lines. Yet up until about a hundred years ago, these two peoples enjoyed a rich and deep shared history of coexistence, and lived together as neighbours in relative peace for centuries.
      This thesis is an attempt to uncover those memories, and use them to rekindle the tradition of cooperative coexistence between Jews and Arabs in that region. It comes from listening to the stories of my mother’s parents, both born in British Mandate Palestine, and from my own unique identity as a Canadian-Israeli-Palestinian-Algerian-Hungarian-Polish Jew and pagan. It comes from my own conflict of understanding the creation of the State of Israel as a rescue spot for Holocaust survivors like my father’s mother, and my discontent with religious nationalism and its racist dimensions. It is above all an affirmation that peace is an ongoing relational process worth cultivating, and will never be achieved so long as Jews and Arabs stay separate, segregated, and ghettoized within their respective communities.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword
Chapter One: Personal Reflection & The Politics of Memory
        Memory
        Childhood
        Arabs & Jews
        Terminology
Chapter Two: Awakening Memory: The Historical Seeds of Arab-Jewish Cooperative Coexistence
Chapter Three: A Critical Analysis: Arab-Jewish Cooperative Coexistence In Israel/Palestine Today
        The Work of Mohammed Abu-Nimer
        Understanding The Political & Social Contexts
        Major Areas of Importance In Assessing & Analyzing Arab-Jewish Cooperative Coexistence Programs In Israel/Palestine (Abu-Nimer)
Chapter Four: Rekindling The Fires: Three Case Studies
        (1) Hand In Hand: The Center For Bilingual Education In Israel
        (2) Ta’ayush: Arab-Jewish Partnership
        (3) Mosaic Communities
Afterword
Bibliography


BRIDGING DIFFERENT TRUTHS:
Creating Dialogue for Reconciliation and Healing

By Yuichi Ohta
E-mail: Flight_For_Peace@yahoo.co.jp

Thesis for Baccalaureate Degree in Peace Studies
The International Christian University, College of Liberal Arts, Division of International Studies
Tokyo, Japan; March, 2003; 106 pages

For this thesis, author Yuichi Ohta was honored with the Makoto Saito Academic Award for Peace Studies. .

The complete manuscript is on the Web at http://traubman.igc.org/ohtathesis.pdf .

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
        Background
        Problem Statement
        Location of Self
Literature Review
Hypothesis and imitations
Methodology
Sampling
Results
Analysis
Suggestions for Future Research
Conclusion
Bibliography
  Works Cited
  Works Consulted
  Works Used for the Sampling Section
Abstract


BUILDING PEACE BETWEEN PEOPLE:
The Role of NGOs in Transforming Relations Between Israelis and Palestinians

By Louis-Alexandre Berg
E-mail: LouisAlexBerg@hotmail.com)

Thesis for Bachelor of Arts Degree
Department of International Relations, Brown University, April 2000, 169 pages

        As the violence and tension continue to escalate between Israelis and Palestinians, new questions emerge about the potential for success of a political peace process. A major criticism of the political process has been its failure to adequately address the material and psychological root causes of the conflict that continue to fuel fear, resentment, hostility and violence for many Palestinians and Israelis.
        While the governments struggle at the official level, growing numbers of citizens have been working behind the scenes to improve relations on the ground and build the basis for a lasting peace. Including women and men from the highest levels of policy-makers to the grassroots, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are addressing those conditions that the political leaders have been unable, or unwilling, to tackle.
        This thesis explores the work of women and men in these NGOs, their basis in principle and theory, practical activities, and especially the difficult challenges they face.
        A question is raised: Can grassroots social and psychological changes - changes in the nature of relationships - make a significant impact on political developments in the short or long term? Or is political progress a prerequisite for social change? Or must both happen together?
        Discussed are the different motives of various NGOs - whether they are promoting the interests of one side or the other, citizens on the ground, foreign governments or elites, donors, or the NGO participants themselves. Explored is the question of whether NGOs are effective and appropriate means of building relations that satisfy and protect the basic interests of both sides and most of society for the long-term good of all.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Chapter 1: A Struggle for Collective Dignity and Identity
Chapter 2: The Role of NGOs
Chapter 3: The Humanization Approach
Chapter 4: The Needs Approach Conclusion
Bibliography
Appendix 1: List and Description of NGOs Included in this Study
Appendix 2: Timeline of Major Events
Appendix 3: Major Documents
        A. The Balfour Declaration
        B. The Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel
        C. U.N. Security Council Resolution 242
        D. U.N. Security Council Resolution 338
        E. The Palestinian National Charter
        F. State of Palestine Declaration of Independence
        G. Israel-PLO Recognition
        H. Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements (The Oslo Accords)
Appendix 4: Maps
        A. Map of Ottoman Palestine - Territorial Divisions
        B. Israel, the West Bank and Gaza


A CALL FOR ADVENTURE-BASED CONFLICT RESOLUTION

by Shawn M. Dunning
E-mail: SDunning@sfcg.org
Web: Director, Leadership Wisdom Initiative, Search for Common Ground http://www.sfcg.org/programmes/lwi/

Master of Science in Conflict Analysis and Resolution thesis
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA; 1099 pages

AUTHOR'S NOTE:
        09 Dec 2010
        I wrote the thesis as a first step to formally conceptualizing a theoretical framework for adventure-based conflict resolution.
        While I did cite some case studies for illustrative purposes, it was mostly theoretical.
        Now, after two years of rolling our Palestinian-Israeli Emerging Leaders Program in partnership with Outward Bound, I’m solidly convinced that there’s a lot more to talk about.
        This stuff really works wonders!

Download the manuscript on the Web at http://traubman.igc.org/dunningthesis.pdf .

ABSTRACT
      The following thesis addresses the role of learning within conflict resolution interventions, drawing particular attention to kinesthetic intelligence (Gardner, 1993). While current conflict resolution practices typically involve verbal and logical modes of learning, this inquiry explores the value of physical movement and interaction in the context of conflict intervention processes. Looking at conflict resolution from an experiential learning frame (learning by “doing” and by reflecting on actions), the value of learning from movement, or “kinesthetic encoding,” is considered in terms of its potentially transformative qualities associated with the “liminal” phase of a “ritual” process.
      Building from a popular approach to kinesthetic experiential learning known as “adventure-based learning” (methods that incorporate teambuilding, outdoor adventure sports, and wilderness travel), a model for “adventure-based conflict resolution” (ABCR), which maps the natural overlap between adventure-based learning and conflict resolution, illustrates the practical utility of using adventure-based approaches in processes intended for preventing, resolving, or reconciling conflict. The model specifies salient characteristics of adventure-based approaches with regard to intended outcomes—specifically in terms of developing positive relationship between parties, developing collaboration skills, and developing potential-realization (confidence).
      Three case studies are described as exemplars of the proposed model: one each for illustrating conflict prevention, conflict resolution, and conflict reconciliation. Each case is analyzed with regard to the level of relationship, skills, and confidence gained in association from the respective adventure-based intervention. Further implications regarding level of conflict and nature of party relationships are discussed, as are the strengths and limitations of the model.


THE COMPASSIONATE LISTENING PROJECT:
A Case Study in Citizen Diplomacy and Peacemaking

By Marie Pace
E-mail: MPace@syr.edu

Thesis for Doctor of Philosophy in Social Science degree
Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflict (PARC)
Maxwel School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Graduate School of Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, May 2005, 275 pages

Download the manuscript on the Web at http://traubman.igc.org/pacethesis.pdf or at pacethesis.doc.

        This dissertation is a qualitative study investigating how a North American based citizen diplomacy effort—the Compassionate Listening Project—is working to promote peace and reconciliation between Arabs and Jews in Israel, Gaza and the West Bank. This study is placed in the context of examining citizens’ emerging role as peacebuilders in divided societies. Using participant observations and in-depth interviews, this study looks at how citizens involved with this project construct and reconstruct the meaning of conflict, peace and peacebuilding through their words, behaviors and interactions. This approach allows for an exploration of the full dynamics of the project, taking into account social, political and historical dimensions. Examining the project from multiple standpoints, this research further reveals the resonance, convergencies, dissonance and disjunctures in individual and organizational beliefs and goals with regards to peacebuilding strategies and goals. These findings further illuminate how ordinary citizens grapple with the complex matters that arise in ethnic and identity-based conflict. In particular, they reveal the ways that citizens aim at pursuing social justice agendas (which often aggravate social tensions) and agendas of reconciliation (which seek to heal those same tensions) at the same time. Illuminated through this project’s experiences are valuable clues about how citizens are attempting to negotiate what John Paul Lederach has described as the tension between revolutionary and resolutionary approaches to peacebuilding. This work contributes to the literature of peacebuilding and Palestinian-Israeli peace and conflict resolution. In particular, it contributes to the neglected area of Americans involvement in citizen based peace processes.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
One: Introduction
        A Hybrid Strategy
        A Different Agenda
        Overview of the Study
        Significance
Two: Theories and Perspectives on Peacebuilding and Social Change
        The Conceptual Terrain of Citizen Peacemaking
        From the Actual World of Citizen Peacemaking
        Theories and Practices of Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding
        Culture and the Politics of Meaning
        The Role of Religion in Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding
        On Listening
        At the Crossroads between Interior and Exterior Worlds Three: Methods and Procedures
        Why Qualitative Methods?
        Why The Compassionate Listening Project?
        Preliminary Research
        Research Design
        Informed Consent
        Collecting the Data
        On Subjectivity and Participant Observations
        Personal Identity and the Research Process
        Culture and Context
        The Final Analysis
Four: Negotiating Paradox
        Genesis of the Project
        The Early Roots
        Citizen Diplomacy
        Compassionate Listening
        The Third Side
        Conclusion
Five: Stories from the Third Side
        THE JEWISH DELEGATES
        Building Bridges and Amending Injustices
        Enemy Encounters
        THE ARAB DELEGATES
        THE OTHERS
        Conclusion
Six: Diplomatic Agendas
        THE ITINERARY
        The Israeli Peace Movement
        Meetings with Israel’s Left
        Voices from Israel’s Right
        Listening Among Palestinians
        Listening to the First Track
        Mixed Agendas
        Conclusion
Seven: Conclusion
        Embracing the Question: So What?
        Replication, Growth and Expansion
        Limitations and Avenues for Further Research
        Trusting the Dark
Bibliography


COMPOSING A CIVIC LIFE:
Influences of Sustained Dialogue on Post-Graduate Civic Engagement and Civic Life

by Ande Diaz
E-mail: AndeDiaz@post.harvard.edu
Web: Ande Diaz Educational Consulting at http://www.andediazconsulting.com

Doctoral thesis
Fielding Graduate University, School of Human and Organizational Development
Santa Barbara, CA, 2009; 189 pages

The full dissertation (189 pages) as well as an article highlighting the Inventory of Dialogue Civic Outcomes (25 pages) and a paper highlighting a transformational concept termed “Restringing” (10 pages) are all available as electronic documents. Please contact author by email.

ABSTRACT
      This study examined the civic outcomes from sustained intergroup dialogue.
      Sustained Dialogue is a multi-stage conflict resolution process where small groups of people meet together over time to dialogue across differences.
      Qualitative interviews were used to study the perceived impacts of college dialogue experience on post-graduate civic life.
      Study participants were graduates of Notre Dame, Princeton, and the University of Virginia, who had participated in the Sustained Dialogue model during college.
      This study generated an inventory of dialogue civic outcomes which details impacts from dialogue articulated as 29 themes over the five domains of cognitions, behaviors, attitudes, and skills, as well as hopes and plans for the future.
      Results confirmed recent research on the Intergroup Dialogue model, finding that participants reported increases in critical thinking, knowledge about intergroup relations, interest in diversity issues, empathy regarding cultural differences, voicing their opinions in public, advocacy behaviors, and skills in facilitation and consensus building.
      This study also extended prior research by finding that these perceived dialogue impacts, as well as several others, lasted into the post-college workplace and also affected future hopes and plans. Additional observations were identified, such as (a) the identified impacts were spread across various civic arenas of society, and (b) a transformative "restringing" effect was apparent in which participants reported that they were changed or transformed in subtle, complex, and pervasive ways.

Keywords: Student development, Sustained Dialogue, Intergroup Dialogue, co-curricular learning, diversity, civic education, civic life, social justice education, race relations, and workforce development.


CONVERSATIONS FOR PEACE:
An Oral History of the Path to Palestinian and Jewish
Reconciliation in Two California Communities

by Allison Helise Rubalcava
E-mail: starefive@cox.net

Thesis for Master of Arts Degree in History, California State University, Fullerton, 2001, 256 pages

Download the complete, highly illustrated manuscript:     (PDF file - 5.6 MB)    (Word document - 6.6 MB)

        This study examines the interplay of memory, myth, and history in the construction of collective memory, collective identity, and historical narrative.
        The result of this interplay is conflicting historical narratives.
        In spite of conflicting narratives, a number of contemporary Palestinian-Jewish organizations in the United States use dialogue as the foundation of their cooperative efforts to demonstrate that peaceful coexistence is possible between Palestinians and Jews.
        In the process a new collective identity is formed based on historical and biblical commonalities rooted in religion and culture.
        This project's use of oral history technique is two-fold.
        First, oral history provides the narrative that comprises the bulk of this study and is used to broaden understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict and issues of collective identity formation.
        Second, oral history (or dialogue) is the vehicle used by the peace groups in their meetings and community outreach projects.
        The two groups included in this study are representative of a larger grass roots movement of conflict resolution founded in dialogue.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ABSTRACT
INTRODUCTION

PART I
History, Theory, and Historiography
Chapter I. This Land is Your Land, This land is My Land:
                    Historical Identification of Arabs and Jews with the Land of Palestine and its Manifestation into Nationalism
                                The Jewish Situation
                                The Arab Situation
                                Imperialism and Nationalism
                                The Palestinian Situation
                                The Current Crisis
Chapter II. My History is Better Than Your History:
                    The Implications of Collective Memory and Revisionism for Jewish and Palestinian Identity
                                Historiography
                                Collective Identity and Collective Memory
                                Conflicting Narratives
                                Reconciliation
PART II
The Peacemakers Speak for Themselves
Chapter III. The Establishment of the Dialogue Groups
Chapter IV. Nobody has a Monopoly on Suffering
Chapter V. Who am I, Who are You, Who are We?
Chapter VI. Areas of Conflict
Chapter VII. Blessed are the Peacemakers
Chapter VIII. Visions of Peace
Chapter IX. Can They Make Peace?
APPENDICES
                1. Arab-Israeli Conflict Timeline
                2. Maps
                3. Dialogue Group Web-index
                4. Dialogue Web-resources
                5. Cousins Club of Orange County Documents
                6. Jewish-Palestinian Dialogue Group of San Mateo Documents
BIBLIOGRAPHY


DIALOGO INTERCULTURAL: Comunidad Arabe y Judia en Chile

By Lorenzo Agar Corbinoes & Abraham Magendzo Kolstrein
A project of Diálogo Intercultural entre jóvenes de la comunidad árabe y judía en Chile (DIJO)
E-mail Lorenzo: LAgar@minsal.cl

Report of 2-year intercultural dialogue experience among Arab and Jewish youth in Chile during July 2006 - February 2008
Santiago, Chile; 2009; 304 pages

Download the manuscript on the Web at http://www.lalleva.com/~felipe/libro.pdf .

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I: Diálogo Intercultural de la Comunidad Árabe y Judía en Chile
        Los jóvenes de la comunidad árabe y judía en Chile: una experiencia fecunda de diálogo intercultural
        Alteridad, derechos humanos, identidad y diversidad: Dispositivos fundantes para un diálogo intercultural
        Revisión a la experiencia de los Talleres Diálogo Intercultural entre jóvenes de la comunidad árabe y judía
        Comunidades Árabe y Judía en Chile: La mirada de los jóvenes
        Diálogo intercultural entre jóvenes de la comunidad árabe y judía en Chile: La mirada de los líderes comunitarios
        Visión de los participantes del diálogo intercultural
Part II: Diálogo Intercultural:Aproximación Histórica, Democracia y Derechos Humanos
        El diálogo intergrupal: ¿Qué es y cómo se diseña?
        Conflicto y pacificación en las relaciones entre las comunidades judías, árabes y musulmanas en Chile y Argentina
        Inmigrantes y élites en Chile
        Identidades y alterofobias
        Relaciones interreligiosas y culturales en la España musulmana y proyecciones de sus aportes en la historia contemporánea
        El Derecho Islámico de Minorías entre el hilo blanco y el hilo negro
ACERCA DE LOS AUTORES


DIALOGUE BETWEEN CHRISTIANS, JEWS AND MUSLIMS: The Concept of Covenant as Basis

By Ian Rex Fry
E-mail: ian.rex.fry@bigpond.com

Thesis for Doctor of Philosophy
MCD University of Divinity
Kew, Victoria, Australia; March 2012; 544 pages

Download the manuscript on the Web at http://traubman.igc.org/frythesis.pdf .

ABSTRACT
This thesis examines in what manner and on what basis communities of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, the Abrahamic faiths, can engage in conversation-dialogue relating to the concept of covenant to enable a greater awareness of their relationship with God and the relationships between each of their communities. To achieve this task, this study critically examines the primary texts of each faith in the context of human history, their origins, development and interaction through a series of five epochs which has been identified and constructed as an integral part of this study. Recommendations are made based on the conclusion that dialogue relating to that concept is not only possible but is vital to enable progress towards stability and harmony in human affairs, and a clearer understanding of humanity’s relationship with God. A number of other intimately related conclusions have been reached. Each of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have been called into existence by divine initiative as a consequence of major breaches of covenant by their successive predecessors, namely Yahwism, then Judaism, then Christianity. Those successive initiatives do not mean that any covenant has been abrogated. They are each extant and their operation is cyclical in accord with the conduct of their adherents. Each covenant involves a common obligation as well as responsibilities specific to each faith. The currency of each covenant, and a partnership between each faith, is shown by the convergence of prophecy related to continuing breaches of covenant which were generated within each of them. This has culminated in the establishment of the State of Israel – the central fact of the Common Era – and also in the relative status of the White Western Christian Bloc and the World Majority Peoples being reversed. This requires recognition of the partnership between the three Abrahamic faiths, and dialogue and cooperation on that basis.

CONTENTS
1.  Introduction. Covenants: templates for the future
2.  The First Epoch: Stage One -- Prehistory, the Abrahamic Era to Israel’s Migration
3.  The First Epoch: Stage Two -- A mature understanding of covenant ready to go!
4.  The Second Epoch: Shared responsibility
5.  The Third Epoch: An extended network, and a new kind of war
6.  Fourth Epoch: A brutal demonstration. Conflict and the reality of covenant
7.  The Fifth Epoch: Covenant applied
8.  Covenant Theology: Current strands and views
9.  Dialogue: Development and current status
10. No turning back. Conclusions and recommendations


EVALUATING PEACE EDUCATION IN THE OSLO-INTIFADA GENERATION:
A Long-Term Impact Study of Seeds of Peace 1993-2010

By Ned Lazarus
E-mail: Ned.Lazarus@gmail.com

Thesis for Doctor of Philosophy In International Relations
Faculty of the School of International Service, American University
Washington, DC USA; 2011; 471 pages

Download the manuscript on the Web at http://traubman.igc.org/lazarusthesis.pdf .

ABSTRACT
Since 1993, several thousand Israeli and Palestinian youth have participated in 12 summer “coexistence” programs in North America. The programs espouse a common theory of change: that an experience of dialogue in an idyllic American setting will inspire youth to return to the Middle East as aspiring peacemakers. This dissertation provides the first large-scale, long-term empirical assessment of that theory, by tracking the peacebuilding activity of all 824 Israeli and Palestinian graduates of SOP's first decade of operation (1993-2003), and complementing this with qualitative research on more than 100 adult graduates (ages 21-30). The longitudinal framework assesses fluctuations in activity over time, highlighting the influence of changing personal, organizational, and political contexts. Key findings include that more than half of alumni engaged in peacebuilding during high school; that compulsory Israeli military service discouraged activity among both Israeli and Palestinian graduates; that nearly one-fifth of alumni engaged in peacebuilding as adults; and that extensive follow-up programming was essential for sustaining long-term commitments to peacebuilding. The study concludes that the international intervention structure embeds an effective educational model in a problematic organizational model. While providing an unprecedented evaluation of a popular peace education approach, this study tells the stories of a pivotal generation: Palestinians and Israelis who entered adolescence at the hopeful dawn of the Oslo peace process, to emerge as adults in an era of intifada and “separation.”

CONTENTS
1.  INTRODUCTION, BACKGROUND, REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
2.  OVERVIEW: Design, Methods, Contribution
3.  QUANTITATIVE FINDINGS: Longitudinal Analysis of Alumni Peacebuilding Activity
4.  FLAG-RAISING: Seeds of Peace and the Ministries of Education
5.  SOLDIER AND/OR A “SEED OF PEACE”: The Israeli Dilemma
6.  DIALOGUE, OCCUPATION AND NORMALIZATION: The Palestinian Dilemma
7.  SELF-DETERMINATION: The Dilemma of Palestinian Citizens of Israel
8.  ALUMNI ASSESSMENTS: "Program" vs. "Organization"
9.  CONCLUSIONS


GENERATING FORGIVENESS AND CONSTRUCTING PEACE
THROUGH TRUTHFUL DIALOGUE: Abrahamic Perspectives

By Hilarie Roseman
E-mail: HilarieRoseman@gmail.com


Hilarie Roseman (81) — May 2014 Graduation Ceremony

Thesis for Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Media, Music, Communication & Cultural Studies
Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, Easter 2013, 404 pages

Download the complete manuscript:     (PDF - 2.3 MB)

The hardcover book can be ordered from Dignity Press and online from Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

ABSTRACT
In interfaith encounter groups, the people of the Abrahamic religions are drawing together in dialogue rather than conflict. The core research question in this thesis is “How are people of Abrahamic faiths, faiths that are implicated in a geopolitical confrontation, able to cooperate within religious organizations?” The analysis is comparative. On the analectic continuum, it stems from a deductive set of questions, but takes into account some inductive emerging issues. 15 participants, perceived as role models for the language of peace, were interviewed at great depth. Social, scientific, and religious knowledge from a questionnaire was discussed by four focus groups consisting of Jews, Christians and Muslims. Commitment to religion, enemy images of each other, ethical dialogue, forgiveness, and the construction of peace made up the discussions. Peace was constructed by remediation of negative attitudes and behavior that often involved hospitality and always involved deep listening. Differences and identities in Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions were clearly stated, but also their commonalities: human needs such as respect and safety, and the religious text to love God and neighbour. They defined this God as forgiving and compassionate, and neighbour as “everyone”. There was a change in their interests, which expanded to all three Abrahamic religions and their language of peace included discussing difficult issues such as the re-examination of their texts, and the paramount need to be open, generous and brave. Their dialogue rose above differences to enable them to lay a reasonable, achievable foundation for a peace, based on human needs and common texts. All participants were reasonably well-informed and well- educated believers committed to their own faith tradition and able to communicate its inner values and spirit. A model was extracted from this research that shows the pathway from externally mediated images of geopolitical conflict to practical expressions of cooperation and peace within interfaith groups. This is an historical social change.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Introduction - Foundational flows of information - Abrahamic religions in Australia - Prior research in Australia - The Problem - Background to Abrahamic religions - Interfaith organizations - Social Science and religion - Research objectives - Structure of thesis - Summary
CHAPTER 2: INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT
Introduction - The Nature of the human being in the World - International Level - Organizational Level - Theories of Forgiveness - Signs of reconciliation - Summary
CHAPTER 3: PEACE, FORGIVENESS AND ETHICAL COMMUNICATION
Introduction - Social Science review - Humanities review - Religious discourse review - Non-governmental organizations discourse review - Frames of reference - Summary
CHAPTER 4: COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Introduction - The case of Blacks and Whites in South Africa - The case of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland - The case of Israel and Palestine - Religion entering into secular politics - The process of reconciliation - Summary
CHAPTER 5: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Introduction - Methodological reflections - Social Change - Focus group interviews - Research process - Data analysis - Summary CHAPTER 6: ACTIVITY REPORT: FOCUS GROUP
Introduction 210 The participants - Enemy images in responses to set questions -The institutional context - The impact of dialogue - Forgiveness - The construction of peace - Summary
CHAPTER 7: BEHAVIOURS AND ATTITUDES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOCUS GROUPS
Introduction - Open coding analysis - Social change: values and interests - Values and leadership - Communication and sustainability of social change - Soft power or propaganda - Key ideas in the Focus Groups - Discussion of findings in terms of theory - Sequence of framework for communication in the Focus Groups - Summary
CHAPTER 8: CONCLUSION
Introduction - Social Change - Has the research question been answered and how? - Critical Self-reflection - Future prospects - Future research - Conclusion
TABLES
APPENDICES
BIBLIOGRAPHY


THE FIELD BEYOND WRONGDOING AND RIGHTDOING:
A Study of Arab-Jewish Grassroots Dialogue Groups in the United States

By Nurete L. Brenner
E-mail: Nurete@hotmail.com

Thesis for Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Organizational Behavior
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, January 2011, 236 pages

Download the complete manuscript:     (PDF - 1.3 MB)

Subsequent article:
The Magic of a Dialogue Group
Published 24 June 2011
http://nlbrenner.wordpress.com/2011/06/24/the-magic-of-a-dialogue-group/

"Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there.
When the soul lies down in that grass, the world is too full to talk about.
Ideas, language, even the phrase 'each other' doesn't make any sense."

            — Jalal al-Din Rumi

PREFACE (excerpt)
      Since personal storytelling is so central to this thesis, I will begin by telling the story of how I encountered Arab-Jewish dialogue and how it impacted me. In 2001 when I moved to Cleveland from Tel Aviv and learned that Cleveland was home to one of the largest Arab-American communities in the US it occurred to me that here was a chance to meet and get to know Palestinians. The irony of this thought is that I was raised in Netanya, Israel which is only about 15 km (9 miles) from the West Bank. Despite this proximity, I never knew any Arabs while growing up. This disconnect is typical of Israelis and Palestinians even in mixed cities like Haifa and Jerusalem. So, upon arriving in Cleveland, I launched an Arab-Jewish dialogue group, which convened on Case campus once every two weeks for almost a year.
      This experience ignited in me a passion to study and facilitate and participate in such groups. I wanted to learn more about the enlightening transformation that I had undergone, to discover if others had experienced the same thing and if so, how to reach out and replicate the experience still further. Thus, this dissertation was begun.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
Part I: Research
        Chapter 1: Statement of Problem
        Chapter 2: Literature Review
        Chapter 3 - Methodology
Part II: Case Studies
        Chapter 4: The West Town Group
        Chapter 5: The Story of the North Town Group
        Analysis of the West Town and North Town groups
        Chapter 6: The East Town Story
        Analysis of East Town Group
Part III: Results
        Chapter 7: The Contact Hypothesis and Social Identity Theory
        Chapter 8: Dialogue and its Dimensions
        Chapter 9: Shift
Part IV: Conclusion
        Chapter 10: Implications for Practice and Conclusion
LIST OF TABLES
        Table Methodology
        Table Dimensions of Dialogue
LIST OF FIGURES
        Figure Theoretical Framework
        Figure The Arc of the Dialogue-Encounter Group
        Figure From Personal Storytelling to Shift


MUSIC FOR PEACE IN JERUSALEM:
A Senior Essay in International Studies

By Micah Hendler
E-mail: Micah.Hendler@gmail.com

A Senior Essay in International Studies
Calhoun College, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, 2012, 84 pages

Download the complete manuscript:     (PDF)

CONTENTS
I.     INTRODUCTION
II.    THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT AND TRACK TWO DIPLOMACY
III.   STRUCTURING ENCOUNTERS
IV.   MUSIC IN THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT
V.    MUSIC AS A PEACEMAKING TOOL IN ETHNIC CONFLICT
VI.   SEEDS OF PEACE INTERNATIONAL CAMP FOR COEXISTENCE IN MAINE: AN IDEAL CASE
VII.  JERUSALEM FIELDWORK
VIII. ANALYSIS
IX.   DISCUSSION
X.    CONCLUSION


QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS: Conflict Resolution Framework and Building Relationships
Through Dialogue in the Peace It Together, 2008 Initiative

By Danielle Sleiman
E-mail: DYS2@sfu.ca

A paper to fulfill graduation requirements for Communications 447
for a Bachelor's degree in Communications, with a minor in Dialogue
Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 2008; 28 pages

The scholar begins: "Imagine an opportunity where young adversaries can step outside the 'pressure cooker of war and recognize their shared humanity, tear down the walls of misunderstandings, and build new bridges to peace.'" She concludes: "...I believe that empowering impacted youth in less formal, neutral negotiating environments and utilizing creative strategies such as film making may be more effective in building the 'bridge of peace' than other negotiation processes."

Download the complete manuscript (28 pages):       (PDF file)

CONTENTS
Introduction
Background
Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Theory: Understanding the Nature of the PIT Conflict Conflict Resolution Framework
Case Studies
        The Camp David Negotiations
        Jewish- Palestinian Living Room Dialogue Group
Role of the Canadian Participants
Transformation: An Outcome of Conflict Resolution Process
Conclusion
Appendix 1
        Peace It Together Survey: Canadian Participants
Appendix 2
        Interview with Len Traubman, Director of Jewish-Palestinian Living Room Dialogue Group
Sources Cited


SHIFT HAPPENS:
Transformation During Small Group Interventions in Protracted Social Conflicts

By Nike Carstarphen
E-mail: NikeC@ConflictTransformation.org
Web: Alliance for Conflict Transformation (ACT) at http://www.conflicttransformation.org

Doctoral thesis
George Mason University, Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution
Fairfax, VA, 2003; 380 pages

Download the complete, highly illustrated manuscript (PDF file -- 14.4 MB) or request file by e-mail.

      This thesis and the paper described below are available as e-mail attachments upon request by e-mail.
      At the February, 2003 Malta International Conference on Intercultural Communication & Diplomacy, Nike presented Making the "Other" Human: The Role of Personal Stories to Bridge Deep Differences, based on her thesis.
      To explore intergroup relationship building and its role in conflict resolution, Nike interviewed diplomats, academics and practitioners of different conflict resolution efforts around the globe.
      She also interviewed participants of dialogue groups in the United States, including: Jewish-Palestinian dialogues, race/ethnic dialogues, and pro-life/pro-choice dialogues around the abortion issue.
      The results suggest the first step in relationship building -- in advance of conflict explanation, analysis, and resolution -- is to "make the 'other' human" and that sharing personal stories -- in the spirit of genuine dialogue -- is one of the most successful starting points in this process.
      Stories help adversaries break through their stereotypes, fears and animosities toward the other by helping them begin to understand and recognize the other's needs, values and core concerns.
      Stories help create bridges across deep differences and lay the foundation for conflict resolution.

Nike Carstarphen's shorter 23-page paper (96 KB PDF) can be downloade by clicking on the title:
      Making the Other Human: The Role of Personal Stories to Bridge Deep Differences.
      Carstarphen, N., In Hannah Slavik (Ed.), International Communication and Diplomacy.
      DiploFoundation, Malta and Geneva, 2004, pp. 177-196.
      
The full thesis can be requested as a PDF document from Nike (NikeC@ConflictTransformation.org) at the office of her Alliance for Conflict Transformation (ACT), on the Web at http://www.conflicttransformation.org/ , or from us, Libby and Len Traubman (LTraubman.igc.org).

TABLE OF CONTENTS of Making the "Other" Human: The Role of Personal Stories to Bridge Deep Differences
Introduction
Tripartite Model of Conflict and Conflict Resolution
Study I: How Do We Make "The Other" Human?
        Research Methods
        Research Results
        Why are Personal Stories Powerful?
Study 2: Experimental Design -- Personal Stories versus Rational Explanations
        Methods
        The Conflict Scenario
        Dependent Variables
                General Attitudes About the Opponent's Personality/Behavior
                Feelings Toward the Opponent
                Understanding/Empathizing with Opponent
                Assumptions About the Opponents' Role in the Conflict
                Attitudes About Our Role in the Conflict
                Expected Negotiations Climate
                Expected Negotiation Outcomes
        Results
                Story
                Explanation
                Story-first
                Explanation-first
Conclusion
Implications for Diplomacy
        Storytelling as Part of Prenegotiation Dialogues and Negotiations
        Spreading New Stories to the Masses
        Facilitated Diplomacy


TOWARD A TYPOLOGY OF DIALOGUE AND DELIBERATION

By Adi Greif
E-mail: AGreif@stanford.edu

Bachelor of Arts Honors thesis
Stanford University, Department of Political Science
Stanford, CA, 2006; 74 pages

Download the complete manuscript:     (PDF file)    (Word document)

ABSTRACT
Dialogue groups that bring together civilians with many perspectives on a conflict and hold face-to-face discussions differ. Facilitators of dialogue groups often claim that their type of dialogue is especially conducive to long-term peace and stability and results in a wider-ranging set of beneficial effects. To evaluate such claims, this paper delineates dialogue groups and their goals by type (and offers a case study to illustrate its structure): 1) dialogue that transforms human relationships in order to build interpersonal trust and reduce prejudice (E.g. Jewish-Palestinian Living Room Dialogue focused on the Arab-Israeli conflict); 2) dialogue that transforms understanding of political interest through consideration of the political interest of others in order to build a common political vision for the future (E.g. Community Dialogue based on the conflict in Northern Ireland); and 3) dialogue that transforms political decision-making from interest-oriented to public-spirited-oriented dialogue in order to find mutually agreeable solutions (E.g. Deliberative Polling Weekends based on problems within mainly developed, peaceful Western countries like America). There is no evidence that one type is superior in transformational potential; the paper concludes by suggesting that the effectiveness of different types of dialogue is contingent upon the problem being addressed.

TABLE OF CONTENTS of Toward A Typology of Dialogue and Deliberation
Introduction
Section 1: Modes of Interaction
      I. Transforming Human Relationships
      II. Transforming Political Interest
      III. Beyond Interests: Public spiritedness
      IV. Conclusion of Section 1
Section 2: Case Study Utilization of Modes of Interaction
      I. Jewish-Palestinian Living Room Dialogue
      II. Community Dialogue
      III. Deliberative Polling Weekends
      IV. Conclusion of Section 2
Section 3: Structure to Maximize Dialogue Strategy
      I. History of the Cases
      II. Organizational Structure: Size, Time
      III. Aspects of Discussion: Pace and Focus
      IV. Location
      V. Participants: Selection, Balance
      VI. Type of Facilitator: Paid, Personally Involved
      VII. Conclusion of Section 3
Section 4: Context and the Need for Future Research
      I. Theory of Change
      II. Context
Conclusion


Jewish-Palestinian Living Room Dialogue Group
1448 Cedarwood Drive, San Mateo, CA 94403
Voice: (650) 574-8303 -- Fax: (650) 573-1217
Web: http://traubman.igc.org/
E-mail:LTRAUBMAN@igc.org

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